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5 creative ideas for fab flowers in shibori stitch resist

shibori stitch resist flowers

Today I thought I would share with you some of the many flower designs I have created. Some flowery inspiration to help you create some great designs from nature in shibori stitch resist.

I will outline the techniques I used to make these nature inspired designs.Some of the patterns I will share with you I have already written a detail blog about, a kind of stitch by stitch account!

5 Step by Step Flower Designs

1. Anemone

This bright anemone design is mainly created using maki age shibori.

  1. This involves stitching around each and every petal shape with a double thread. I created 4 petal shapes to create the impression of the flower. I wanted to create a “dark” centre and this is easiest done by leaving the centre of the motif unstitched. The design pattern is first outlined in a running stitch which is pulled up tightly then bound around with a heavier thread. This image shows the stitching before the design is pulled up.
  2. The threads are pulled up and then a heavier weight thread is used to wind around the shape leaving quite a good amount of the gathered fabric exposed.
  3. The stem is added below the petals. This is created by carefully making a pleat along the line of the stem so you are pinching 4 thicknesses of fabric in your fingers. With a double thread and small cotton “tag” in the end sew through all the 4 layers of fabric.
  4. Each row of stitching is gathered up and tied off and then the fabric is dyed with fibre reactive dyes.

Here is the blog that gives more details.

2. Echinacea

This golden flower design uses 3 shibori stitch resist procedures.

  1. The central flower head is created by folding the fabric in half along the centre line and then sew the 8 or 9 lines of simple running stitches parallel to each other through both layers of fabric with double thread and a small cotton “tag” knotted into the end of each row of double thread. (This is very similar to creating a teasel shown on my video)
  2. The florets or petals are created with a simple fold (ori nui Shibori) stitching through two layers of fabric.
  3. Each long petal is made up of 2 separate rows of this single fold and running stitch technique, each row finishing just below the central flower head at the top of the design.  The curved end shape is quite tricky to manipulate.
  4. The stem is added below the petals. This is created by carefully making a pleat along the line of the stem so you are pinching 4 thicknesses of fabric in your fingers. With a double thread and small cotton “tag” in the end sew through all the 4 layers of fabric.
  5. All the stitching is pulled up and secured and then the fabric is dyed in this case with fibre reactive dyes.

Here is a detailed description with further illustrations.

3. Handsome Hogweed

This is a lovely simple design and many people like to create this on my workshops. It principally employs two shibori stitch methods. This is one for beginners.

  1. The bracts and stem are made by simple running stitches. The bract is made by a simple fold and stitching through two layers of fabric. The stem of the hogweed flower head, to a length suitable for your fabric, is formed by carefully making a pleat along the line of the stem so you are pinching 4 thicknesses of fabric in your fingers. With a double thread and small cotton “tag” in the end sew through all the 4 layers of fabric.
  2. The “seeds” are made by tying beads into the fabric from the back of the fabric. Use a thick thread and wind it around the bead 3 or 4 times.
  3. Again each row of stitching is gathered up and firmly tied and then dyed with fibre reactive dyes.
  4. This design is available as a downloadable PDF

4. Ragged Robin

A reasonably simple design but careful manipulation of all the rows of stitching are required. So perhaps not one for beginners.

The base of the flower head is created by folding the fabric in half along the centre line and then sew the 4 or 5 lines of simple running stitches parallel to each other through both layers of fabric with double thread and a small cotton “tag” knotted into the end of each row of double thread. (This is very similar to creating a teasel shown on my video)

The florets or petals are created with a simple fold (ori nui Shibori) stitching through two layers of fabric.

Each petal is made up of these separate rows of this single fold and running stitch technique, each row starting just above the flower base.

The stem is added by making a pleat along the line of the stem so you are pinching 4 thicknesses of fabric in your fingers. With a double thread and small cotton “tag” in the end sew through all the 4 layers of fabric.

This design is dyed with indigo after each row of stitching is gathered up and firmly tied to make the resist.

5. Thorny Thistle

This again is quite a complicated design as there are 4 different Shibori stitches used in this design.

  1. The thistle cup itself is created by folding the fabric in half along the centre line of the cup and then sew the 8 or 9 lines of simple running stitches through both layers of fabric with double thread and a small cotton “tag” knotted into the end of each row of double thread.
  2. The flower head is made from about 20 lines getting slightly longer away from the body of the thistle. Sew these 20 lines with simple running stitches through one layer of fabric along the top with double thread and a small cotton “tag” knotted into the end of each row of double thread.
  3. Add two side bracts by a simple fold and stitching through two layers of fabric
  4. A stem can be added from the bottom of the thistle head, to a length suitable for your fabric or design. This is created by carefully making a pleat along the line of the stem so you are pinching 4 thicknesses of fabric in your fingers. With a double thread and small cotton “tag” in the end sew through all the 4 layers of fabric.
  5. Then pull all the stitching up and secure the ends before dyeing with fibre reactive dyes.

Here is more information on making a thistle.

Finally

I hope these images and wording enables you to make and form some fabulous flowers or inspires you in your own designs. Do go to the individual blogs by following the links. And my general blog “7 Helpful Hints for Shibori Sewing” is most useful along with my video showing me creating a teasel head which gives detailed instructions on how to sew shibori.

For further instruction join me on one of my workshops or find one near you.

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